A Gift of Nature

The World of Jade – 100% a Gift of Nature

What you are buying is nature’s gift to us. It is one of the most enduring and toughest minerals on Earth. Jade, composed of fine-grained, highly intergrown, interlocking crystals, is the name for both minerals called jadeite and nephrite. Jadeite, the rarest and most valuable form of jade, is also called Burmese Jade (after its traditional and still most important source).

Jade prices can be anything between a few dollars and millions.

Poh Seng Jewellers Pte Ltd gives you a Gemstone Report by Nan Yang Gemological Institute stating the character of your jade purchase is genuine. It states weight, composition, cut and shape, colour, transparency and measurements.

Buy Jadeite – it is More Expensive and of Higher Quality

Jadeite is a semitransparent to nearly opaque mineral that is crafted into the finest jade available. It occurs in mottled green and white (often called moss-in-snow, and quite desirable), brown, violet, lavender, orange-red, yellow and other variations. The finest, most expensive jadeite is an intense green, similar to the finest colour emerald and is referred to as Imperial Jade.

Today many people consider jadeite to be the real jade rather than nephrite and it can command high prices due to its more vivid colours and finer translucency. Jadeite comes from Myanmar; and Upper Myanmar, near Tawmaw and Hpakon, has been the sole source of high quality Imperial Jade since the mid 1700’s.

History of Jade – for Luck and Good Health

Jade has been around since ancient times. Emperors and the wealthy in China’s past dynasties worshipped and prized it. Genuine jade has long been used as a lucky charm, for warding off evil spirits, for safe journeys, wisdom and long life and for slowing down ageing. This stone is said to bring peace and serenity and to aid high blood pressure, and to help heart and circulation problems, diabetes, kidney and bladder problems.

What is jade?

Jade, composed of fine-grained, highly intergrown, interlocking crystals, is the name for both minerals called jadeite and nephrite. Jadeite, the rarest and most valuable form of jade, is also called Burmese Jade (after its traditional and still most important source), and nephrite is often called iberian, New Zealand, Wyoming or SpinachJade. Both have remarkable strength; greater than steel because of the nature of their crystals.

The best of jadeite is also called Imperial Jade and is usually cut into oval dome shapes called cabochons. Jadeite bangles are popular in Asia and the beads make beautiful necklaces and bracelets. The image of the Buddha is another popular form and is often carved out of Imperial Jade. One necklace, named the Doubly Fortunate, is made of 27 Imperial Jade beads and clasped with one diamond. It was sold at auction for US$9.3 million.

Nephrite

Nephrite, the traditional form of jade, has been used for over 5000 years by many different cultures throughout the world. It is the Chinese, however, who appreciated it with a passion. As nephrite is more common than jadeite, it is also less expensive. With jewellery pieces, nephrite typically sells for relatively less than jadeite. Nephrite’s colour is different from jadeite. Its greens are darker, less saturated and more subdued. It can be streaked or mottled like jadeite and can be green, yellow, black, brown, grey, red, white and, rarely, blue. Because of its abundance and inexpensive nature, nephrite is often carved, since waste isn’t as much of an issue as with jadeite.

Jade Types

The popularity of jade has placed it into classifications according to its treatment, colour, transparency and so forth; for example the high-end Type A is followed by Type B, Type C, Type B+C; and then Coated Jade.

Type A Natural jadeite that has not undergone any treatment process to enhance its beauty and durability, except for polishing and surface waxing. This includes prized top quality jadeite.

Type B Jadeite that has undergone acid bleaching to remove impurities, and thereafter strenghtened with polymer. It retains its original colour but the polymer may age and fade with time.

Type C Coarse grain jadeite that is dyed. Dyed colour veins can be seen with magnification and also bands show under a spectroscope.

Type B+C It combines treatments from Type B and C. If it lacks colour, it will be subject to dyeing during the polymer injection stage.

Coated Jade A layer of green plastic material coats the surface of a light-coloured or colourless jadeite piece. The surface will show bubble blisters which scratch easily.

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