Eating During Christmas Season

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During the Christmas season, the body and mind senses seem to drift with the amount of food that comes our way. The tendency to indulge in the many foods shared at Christmas reduces the same feelings of guilt.

However, it’s not a pleasant thought to start the New Year carrying any extra pounds. Let’s not eat into a resolution to ‘shed that few extra pounds’ if it can be smartly avoided?

Be it cookies and candies at work shared, or an evening out at a party or dinner, you can have Christmas food and enjoy it. While seemingly eating heartily with a smile, the key is to have a secret strategy of moderation, sticking to a plan that can be called ‘Eating allotment.’

‘Eating allotment’ is about the quantity of what is eaten. It is important because it is almost impossible to avoid exposure to a lot of cookies, candies and other sweets at Christmas. At work, declining all the time when some Christmas goodies are offered, may risk yourself appearing like a spoilsport dampening the spirit of the holidays especially since at that time of year everyone is usually in a festive and more relaxed mood.

A practical way to partake in Christmas goodies, for example, instead of just taking one cookie, from the platter, which is noticeable and likely will encourage a colleague to tell you to have more, take three instead. The plan is then to enjoy the cookies over two or more hours because nobody will be watching how you really eat. You can always have a few candies or a cookie and a half by your desk and that way it will seem as if you are heartily enjoying the holiday treats.

Another is to bring low-calorie Christmas cookies and candies to work to offset others that are being offered. Since eating healthy is highly encouraged, health-conscious cookies will not be looked down upon so long as they taste great. A box of sugar-free chocolate Candies, for example, will look just as delightful as regular chocolate candies.

For an occasion such as a Christmas party or a dinner, where larger quantities and selection of food is available, the ‘Eating allotment’ plan means that serving portions and the choice of food selected should be carefully watched.

At a party where more desserts and sweets are likely to be available, keep to a selected few. If the urge to try everything can’t be resisted, then do so, but skip the second helpings. The same is true for Christmas Dinners but the food served during Christmas Dinner will be heavier, so by selecting portions wisely, one can always say truthfully that the stomach is full.

And indeed, after a sumptuous dinner, your body is likely to be full from food and your soul full of joy from sharing another memorable holiday tradition with family, friends and loved ones.

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