Banish Room Odour

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Remove lingering bad smells from your house.

Is there a peculiar smell in your room? Many things can cause a room to smell less than divine. Cooking smells for one can really linger; and for smaller apartments, they can pervade easily through the doors especially if you have no cooker hood installed. If you do a lot of frying, a thin film of grease could settle on walls, furniture, and finishing, contributing to an unpleasant odour over time. Also, during food preparation, the smell from raw meat especially fish could be quite potent and it could take a while for the smell to dissipate completely. Poor ventilation adds to odour woes, sealing in these unpleasant smells.

Other things can exacerbate this condition. Cigarette smoke for example can settle on home furnishings, leaving a stale smell behind. This is worsened if the room is poorly ventilated. Smokers are so used to the smell of nicotine that they fail to register its lingering presence in their immediate surroundings. Step into a bar when it is closed in the daytime and you could very well be overpowered by the heady mix of cigarette and alcohol smell.

Pets, musty furniture, and mould & mildew are other olfactory culprits that can make hosting a pain. When we so much as detect an unfamiliar whiff, what we usually do is to grab an air freshener and spray away. Every household has one; car owners also are equipped with at least one bottle in their stash. But, this may not be the best solution long-term. What air fresheners do is basically mask the bad smell. And sometimes, you have to admit that after spraying, the room may not seem to smell much better than before. Besides, some of the air fresheners may contain chemicals that could pose health hazards; they may contain ingredients such as formaldehyde that is known to cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and nose among other conditions. Inhaling these chemicals in the long run may not be conducive to health and is especially bad for small children, pregnant women, and those with respiratory conditions.

How about candles? They are an attractive choice with their ease of use and variety of scents. These are economical too; a small stick can last hours and weeks. But burning the candles will diffuse smoke that disperses in the air, leaving residues on your walls and furnishings, exacerbating the room odour over time. The more pigmented the candle and the stronger the scent, the more oil residue it will settle in your home. Candles that are organically made are different. These are made from pure beeswax that is not harmful to your health. In addition, using candles made from pure essential oils will lessen the chemical build-up in your home too. Let’s look further at some other solutions to tackle household odour.

Keep it ventilated

Moisture helps mould and mildew to fester and sprout. Good ventilation keeps this in check. Whenever possible, open the windows in the house and let the air in. Open the doors to the rooms when they are not in use to keep some air circulation going. After a shower, open the bathroom door to dry the stall or install exhaust fan inside. The exhaust fan is helpful in keeping the ventilation in order, reducing moisture and the infestation of mould to occur, a common problem in bathrooms.

Sun is the cure

The sun’s powerful rays can remove most smells, making it a powerful deodoriser. Which is why, musty linen, clothing, and even bags smell much fresher after a sun-tan. The best part is that it is free, so feel free to indulge in the sun, for your bad-smelling linen and shoes that is.

Regular cleaning

Cleaning your home regularly is the only way to maintain the cleanliness of your home, including banishing bad smells permanently. It is no secret that a clean home is void of peculiar smells. So, wipe all household surfaces regularly and give the bathroom a good scrubbing every week. After every cooking, clean the kitchen and mop the floor to keep all grease and grime away.

Utilise natural cleansers

The best cleansers are actually stored in your kitchen cabinet. Baking soda for one is a powerful deodoriser and cleaning agent. Pour some into a small dish and leave it in areas where you need some extra deodorising such as shoe cabinets and refrigerator. Refrigerators especially can yield rather heady smells from all that meat produce and garlic sauces for example. Putting a small dish of baking soda can help to neutralise the smell inside; its natural and non-chemical properties (baking soda can be taken for medicinal purposes such as colds) mean that they are safe to use on countertops and utensils such as plates. On top of the kitchen, baking soda can be sprinkled onto bad-smelling sofas and textiles before vacuuming; this will help to keep it disinfected and clean.

White or acetic vinegar is another household cleaning agent that has many uses. It is also a deodoriser and it has disinfecting properties as well. Mix the vinegar and water and use it to spray on areas where mildew is likely to form, such as bathroom sinks, shower curtains, bathroom tubs, and toilet stalls. Spray after cleaning the bathroom and you can be assured that the mildew stays away. After spraying, there will be an acidic smell that some may not be used to but let the area dry instead of wiping it off for the disinfection to be effective. Some may recommend replacing the vinegar with lemon instead. It works as well and is perhaps more pleasing because of its citrusy scent.

Natural air fresheners

Instead of commercial air fresheners, make a natural freshener yourself. Make one with pure essential oils. Add a few teaspoons of oils into a spray bottle filled with water; the bottle is preferably not made of plastic for fear of the essential oils eroding into the plastic. Also, get a bottle that is not transparent. You can re-use any old bottles you have. With that, you can spray onto areas in the home where you need a bit of pick-me-up. Get different essential oils for different purpose; there are those with disinfecting properties like lavender and lemon. Also, there are others with anti-bacterial properties too to suit your various purposes. If not, you can always consider buying flowers; these are great as natural deodorisers and home decoration at the same time.

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